Summary of Advertisements

In this mornings lesson we looked at 5 or more adverts and annotated them. In Neil’s lesson, we looked at the old ‘Old Spice Advert’ from the 1970’s and what the more ‘modern’ version looks like. Then we looked at some of the new ‘internet versions of advertising’. What this means is that we looked at a different type of advertising, by watching videos such as this – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=59L51yWUFiQ

 

Then we looked at a different type of advertisement in which does not have an academic name for, the video we watched was this – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPCkcKNUVoo. This ‘Iluminati Confirmed’ video is a parody if you like of peoples theories etc, taking the ‘piss’ out of what some people believe. This being what people think of the iluminati being everywhere.

Casting Director Advertisment

Job Description: 

According to the Casting Society of America (CSA), casting directors work directly for studios and production companies, and their agencies function like human resource departments (http://www.castingsociety.com). Casting directors typically work on a freelance basis, charging a set fee for each production in which they’re involved. They must possess strong interpersonal and communication abilities, because they work closely with producers, directors, writers, casting agents, and talent agencies. Being a casting director also requires a flexible schedule, because the job requires long hours and often frequent travel to find talent or meet with producers, directors, and other key production staff.

Job Duties:

Casting directors, also called talent directors, read scripts and collaborate with producers, directors, and writers to create breakdown notices, which are brief descriptions of the physical attributes, skills, and experience sought in actors to portray particular characters. With the aid of casting assistants, casting directors submit these breakdown notices to agents and talent agencies. Casting directors then receive actors’ headshots and resumes, which they must sift through to select the most qualified actors and schedule them for auditions, often with the help of casting assistants.

Depending on the size and scope of a production, a casting director may hold an initial round of auditions and personally decide which actors to call back for the producer and director. After each round of auditions, the casting director becomes responsible for notifying and scheduling selected actors for additional rounds of auditions, until a final casting decision is made. Although the decision of which actors to cast is ultimately up to directors or producers, casting agents often directly influence the decision of which actor is cast for a particular role.

Educational Requirements:

Formal educational training isn’t required to become a casting director, but experience is necessary. Many casting directors begin their careers as casting assistants to CSA casting directors, by apprenticing for casting agents or as interns for talent agencies and production companies. Individuals seeking careers as casting directors can increase their opportunities by completing bachelor’s degree programs or taking classes in theater or film production, acting, or business.

Salary Info and Job Outlook:

According to PayScale.com, talent directors earned a median of $90,905 as of February 2014. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, http://www.bls.gov) does not provide information specific to the field of casting direction, the BLS did project that the employment of producers and directors will likely grow by about 3% between 2012 and 2022, a rate that’s slower than the average predicted for all occupations.

Links:

http://education-portal.com/articles/Casting_Director_Job_Description_Duties_and_Education_Requirements.html

Choosing a Job Role.

There is a diverse range of jobs throughout the media industry. There are a variety of methods of employment, which gives people the flexibility to find a job role that suits there needs and would like to be. You can do this by going down a number of different routes for example creative, editorial, research, financial. Throughout this post I will go into detail for each and every sector of the media industry and the certain job roles and opportunities within them.

 

The creative of the industry they help to set the scene, and make the film accurate and realistic for the audience. In addition they also help to portray a genre within a film or a different form of media, for example in horror films the creative team play a very important role, as they use make up, costumes and props to set the scene for the part of the film the director is wanting to record.

Different Job Roles:

Director

Hair and Make-up: Make up & Hairdresser Designer

Casting: Casting Director

Performing

Music

Props: Props Media, Prop Master, PropMaker

Script

Lighting: Best Boy, Gaffer, Moving Light Operator

Producer

Construction: Construction Manager, Model Marker

Costume: Costume designer, Costume Maker

Camera: Camera Operator, Script Operator.

 

Director:

A Director has one of the main roles as they have to work with the different departments and they also help to translate the script to a film on screen. The director commission a scripter writer to work with them or sometimes they may write the scripts themselves. Directors also look at the casting and make sure their actors are up to standard. In addition they also have to keep their team connected, motivated and focused on the jobs they are doing. For example, when editing the final ‘cut’; managing the work of the other production staff and delegating tasks accordingly to realise the final production. The typical activities of a director contain elements such as; interpreting the script; developing storyboards; directing actors; managing technical details; making decisions about location and design. Directors must also always be aware of the constraints of the film’s budget and schedule.A director works long intensive hours, they work as many hours as needed and will work from the beginning to the end of the film production working on all the aspects with the other staff needed to complete a film. Attention to detail, and the ability to remain calm and think clearly under great pressure are key skills needed for this job. There are many jobs roles within the directors role: film director, assistant director, second assistant. 

Costume Department: Costume Designer:

The costume department is responsible for anything the actors may wear. In addition they all do the manufacturing, purchase, hire and fitting of the costumes for the actors. Costumes provides information about the film e.g. cultures, social background. The costume designer is in charge of designing all of the costumes needed for the actors in the production, they also do the creating, hiring and transporting too. The director will give the costume designer a brief on how they want the characters to look within the film therefore this is crucial to the success of the film as if they get the costume wrong it may ruin the atmosphere of the feel and put the audience off. This is because the costume is important to revealing the elements of the film, as the characters are immediately judged on the way they look as this means that the costume designer must know the characters personality and be able to match their history with what they are wearing. For example if an actor is wearing rags and another one is wearing a expensive huge dress then this helps to compare the different classes and the period of the film. Therefore this needs a lot of research. A costume designer is in charger of the of a team and gives direction to them this helps to create a successful project. Another job the costume designer does is that he keeps track of the budget and costs associated with the creation of the costumes and that they achieve the deadline. Costume designers may be required to work long hours; evening and weekend work may be involved when working to deadlines. A typical starting salary for a costume designer may be between £13,000 and £18,000 a year, which could rise to around £28,000 a year with experience.

Editorial:

Editing is the process of selecting and preparing written, visual, audible, and film medium used to convey information through the processes of correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications in various media, performed with an intention of producing a correct, consistent, accurate, and complete output.

Different Job Roles:

Editing & Post Production Overview

Editor

Post Production Supervisor

Assistant Editor

Second Assistant Editor

Title Designer

 

Editor: 

A film or video editor is in charge of taking raw material from filming and putting it all into a ‘final product’, in which then can be broadcast. The material could be camera footage, dialogue, special effects and sound effects. This role is key for the post-production as it determines the quality of the final product. The majority of film/video editors are employed on a freelance basis, meaning they work on short-term contracts for post-production studios, television companies and corporate employers. Editors may work on a variety of productions including feature
film’s, television programmes, music videos, corporate training videos or commercials.

EU Media Futures Forum pic_0

Digital technology, specialist computer software and high-quality digitisation of sound and pictures have effectively replaced the traditional manual method of cutting film. Depending on the product, an editor may be very involved in creating the narrative, structure and tone of the programme or film. In some situations, they may be given creative freedom while in others they may be needed merely to operate the machine.


The process of work for an editor involves:

  • Receiving a brief, and maybe an outline of footage and/or a shot list, script or screenplay.
  • Assembling all raw footage, with camera shots either recorded or transferred onto video tape in preparation for inputting into the computer.
  • Inputting uncut rushes and sound, and synchronising and storing then into files on the computer.
  • Digitally cutting the files to put together the sequence of the film and deciding what is usable.
  • Creating a ‘rough cut’ (or assembly edit) of the programme/film and determining the exact cutting for the next final stages.
  • Recording and tweaking the content to ensure the logical sequencing and smooth running of the film/video

The final stage of the process requires skills of the online editor, who is often employed in a specialist post-production facility. An online editor is responsible for delivering the final product to the required specifications. Their role is focused on technical accepts such as correcting faulty footage, grading/colouring, and adding special effects to finish the film or programme. In lower budget productions one editor may perform both the online and offline editing.

 

 

 

 

 

Documentary Reviews

1- Bones Brigade: An Autobiography What is it? This documentary follows six teenagers who formed a skateboarding team in the 1980s, revitalizing the sport and becoming its top athletes. Who? Tony Alva – Himself Steve Caballero – Himself Fred Durst – Himself Tommy Guerrero – Himself Tony Hawk – Himself Where is it? 1970s – 1980s America Bones Brigade

2- Super Size Me What is it? Super Size Me is a 2004 American documentary film directed by and starring Morgan Spurlock, an American independent filmmaker. Spurlock’s film follows a 30-day period from February 1 to March 2, 2003 during which he ate only McDonald’s food. The film documents this lifestyle’s drastic effect on Spurlock’s physical and psychological well-being, and explores the fast food industry’s corporate influence, including how it encourages poor nutrition for its own profit. Who? Morgan Spurlock – Himself Where is it? United States Super Size Me

Filming Plan – Draft

We will record some teenagers thoughts on stereotypes about their generation and/or ask them if they would stand up to it and deal with the image of teens. Ask them about what they think the stereotyped teenager is a would they agree. Is it fair to judge an age group who are going through many changes in their life and very quickly. Do you think that teenagers play up to their stereotypes so they fit in? Interview one (Transcript): Lily Winterford, 17. Daisy: What is a stereotypical teenager? Lily: Moody, umm.. annoying and loud. They don’t care about anything. Daisy: Do you think you are a stereotypical teenager? Lily: Yes, because I believe i do what other teenagers do. Daisy: Do you think that it is fair to judge our generation? Lily: No, everyone is different. No one should be judged at all. You should be yourself. Daisy: Do you think that teenagers play up to the stereotype? Lily: Sometimes, as they think it’s cool to act that way. Daisy: And just one last question. Do you believe that teens are stereotyped more than other age groups? Lily: Yes, definitely, because they seem to be under the spotlights and are stereotyped within the media industry a lot more.
Here is our first draft to prepare us for filming within the next week. Equipment: Camera Tripod Microphone Tapes Headphones Batteries The paperwork we will need is as follows: Questionnaires Release forms Interview questions Script Storyboard Interviews: Questions Four teenagers Two adults Location General filming: Location Noise levels Wild track Lighting General public

Interviews

We will record some teenagers thoughts on stereotypes about their generation and/or ask them if they would stand up to it and deal with the image of teens. Ask them about what they think the stereotyped teenager is a would they agree. Is it fair to judge an age group who are going through many changes in their life and very quickly. Do you think that teenagers play up to their stereotypes so they fit in? Interview one (Transcript): Lily Winterford, 17. Daisy: What is a stereotypical teenager? Lily: Moody, umm.. annoying and loud. They don’t care about anything. Daisy: Do you think you are a stereotypical teenager? Lily: Yes, because I believe i do what other teenagers do. Daisy: Do you think that it is fair to judge our generation? Lily: No, everyone is different. No one should be judged at all. You should be yourself. Daisy: Do you think that teenagers play up to the stereotype? Lily: Sometimes, as they think it’s cool to act that way. Daisy: And just one last question. Do you believe that teens are stereotyped more than other age groups? Lily: Yes, definitely, because they seem to be under the spotlights and are stereotyped within the media industry a lot more.